Category: Faith

Jim Wallis on welcoming the stranger

Editor’s note: This is the sixth and final installment in A More Welcoming Way, a series of TC articles on the immigration experience, attempts at reform and the church’s role in the process. For the past few years, Sojourners has been intimately involved in efforts to reform America’s broken immigration system. We took up this issue because we believe that our Christian faith compels us to…  [more]

Beer, bread, chocolate - and Jesus?

I apologize in advance to those of you who don't live within driving distance of Chicago, because I'm about to literally whet your appetite for something you won't be able to attend. On Tuesday, April 7, I'll be sitting down with TC contributor John J. Thompson to discuss his new book, Jesus, Bread, and Chocolate; Crafting a Hand-Made Faith in a Mass Market World. The best part? We'll be doing it…  [more]

The story of Reyna Garcia

Editor’s note: This is the fifth installment in A More Welcoming Way, a series of TC articles on the immigration experience, attempts at reform and the church’s role in the process. When Michigan law changed in 2008, barring undocumented immigrants from holding a driver’s license, Reyna Garcia could no longer attend her Catholic church because it was beyond walking distance from her home. So she…  [more]

Colbert Catechism covers Lent and Pope Francis

Perhaps to help us bide time until he takes over as host of The Late Show, Stephen Colbert recently made a video (embedded below) for the Catholic magazine America that showcased the same comic-religious sensibility that defined the best episodes of The Colbert Report. Called “Colbert Catechism,” the video features a casual interview between a newly bearded Colbert and James Martin, editor-at-large of…  [more]

The hardest person to forgive

Say the word forgiveness and the minds of many may drift to images of a spatting couple on a couch mending their words with an embrace. Perhaps for others it conjures up images of bullies, bosses or vindictive ex-lovers. But for some of us the hard work of forgiveness runs much deeper than playground banter or office politics, because the ones who ultimately need forgiveness the most are, in fact, ourselves.  …  [more]

40 years of Saturday Night Live religious sketches

I grew up on the Church Lady, the Dana Carvey character whose “Church Chat” sketch was a staple of Saturday Night Live in the late 1980s and early ’90s. Most of the grownups around me would have considered it “sputton” (Dutch-American slang for sacrilegious), but revisiting “Church Chat” now, in advance of SNL’s 40th anniversary show, I was struck by how often the…  [more]

The boy who cried heaven – and the belief industry that encouraged him

Last week, Tyndale House Publishers stopped production of The Boy Who Came Back from Heaven after Alex Malarkey, the boy in question, announced that he had made up the tale. Cheeky jokes about the family’s surname aside, this is a serious matter that shouldn't go gently away, but rather stand as a reminder of what it means to speak for and about God, the Christian life and the kingdom at hand. Years…  [more]

Why I’m not surprised Ryan Bell turned atheist after his year without God

At the beginning of 2014, former pastor Ryan Bell decided to try out atheism for a year (and blog about it, of course). As he put it, “For the next 12 months I will live as if there is no God. I will not pray, read the Bible for inspiration, refer to God as the cause of things or hope that God might intervene and change my own or someone else’s circumstances.” At the beginning of 2015, Bell…  [more]

Guess who’s still haunting David Bazan?

The author Flannery O’Connor said that while the culture of the American south was not actually Christ-centered, it was, in fact, “Christ haunted.” As a relatively recent transplant to the region I get her point. Even among people and institutions that have intentionally left the confines of faith, the shadow of the Gospel looms large. The same can be said for indie rocker David Bazan’s moody…  [more]

Three things each of us can do to resist racism – right now

In the weeks since two separate grand juries decided not to indict white police officers Darren Wilson and Daniel Pantaleo in the homicides of two black men, Michael Brown and Eric Garner, race has been at the forefront of many conversations. It’s a discussion fraught with tension, at once recalling America’s terrible past of African enslavement and bringing forth the reality of present-day disparity and…  [more]

See the latest in: