Category: Science & Technology

The Apple Watch and incarnational living

I have always been a “watch person,” continuing to wear a wristwatch long after mobile phones had more or less made them unnecessary. So I was thrilled to receive an Apple Watch as a Christmas gift this year. In a month of use, I have been pleasantly surprised by the way that it has changed my relationship to technology and my own health. In a way, the Apple Watch even invites me to reflect on…  [more]

Watch Marsden, Mouw, Plantinga and Wolterstorff at Calvin College’s January Series

We’ve been following Calvin College’s January Series of lectures on faith and culture, and are pleased to bring you video of one of the more engaging talks thus far. “The Renaissance of Christian Thought” reunited four luminaries from Calvin’s past - George Marsden, Richard Mouw, Alvin Plantinga and Nicholas Wolterstorff - for a wide-ranging consideration of the state of Christian…  [more]

It’s time for a Christian consensus on climate change

Over the weekend, nearly 200 nations signed on to the Paris Agreement. After nine years of vigorous diplomatic work and 20 other international meetings, the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) ended with the secretary general of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon, saying, “We have truly universal agreement on climate change.” Universal agreement. Of course, now the actual governments represented at the…  [more]

Mark Zuckerberg, the Rich Young Man

Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan announced last week that they intend to “give 99% of our Facebook shares — currently about $45 billion — during our lives” toward a mission “advancing human potential and promoting equality.” The occasion for the announcement was the birth of the couple’s first child, a daughter named Max. While some have accused Zuckerberg and Chan of…  [more]

CSLewisDoodle: pitching a tent in YouTube culture

You’ve seen them before: the illustrated YouTube videos that condense TED Talks or leadership books into four-minute, hand-drawn illustrations. Now there’s a new voice (or rather old) on this scene: that of C. S. Lewis. CSLewisDoodle takes the Christian apologist’s essays and illustrates them with hand-sketched illustrations. Since its inception in 2012, the YouTube phenomenon has gained 12,600…  [more]

The New York Times’ redemptive use of virtual reality

The thick bundle that is the Sunday edition of the New York Times arrived in our driveway as usual last weekend, but this time it had an extra pouch attached. Inside was a Google Cardboard — a small, rectangular, virtual reality viewer. After downloading a video from the Times onto your smartphone and then sliding your phone into a notch on the viewer, you could look through the lenses and watch a 360-degree,…  [more]

Embracing the mystery of Biblical miracles

A recent Slate article reflects on the problem of how to understand Biblical miracles in our modern world. One possible solution, taken to extreme by Thomas Jefferson some 200 years ago, is to simply ignore any mention of miracles. The third president of the United States actually excised from his Bible anything he considered too mysterious to be truth, resulting in what's known as the Jefferson Bible. At least…  [more]

The WHO bacon scare and a theology of enjoyment

Last week, the World Health Organization (WHO) tried to take our bacon away. Or at least that’s how some news organizations first interpreted the announcement that processed meats have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. The real news was less dire, only announcing that the evidence confirms a link between colorectal cancer and certain eating habits (such as eating two strips of bacon a day). Over at…  [more]

Power, community and the rise of ad blocking

Depending on where you stand, the increasing ability of Web users to block advertisements either means the end of the free Internet or a new era of personalized browsing. For those of us who grew up as the Web was just taking off, the possibility of blocking ads represents yet another paradigm shift in the relationship between content providers and users. In the 1990s, browsing the Web included the inevitable fight…  [more]

What Peeple gets wrong about people

Few startups have been met with as much instant animosity as Peeple. Originally described as a "Yelp for people," the proposed app would allow you to rate and comment on your acquaintances in three categories: personal, professional and dating. (There are even plans for a five-star rating system.) When news of the startup broke last week, the backlash was so immediate and widespread that some have speculated Peeple…  [more]

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