Culture At Large

Earth Day resources for Christians (Part 1)

Kim

Although environmentalism as a movement dates to the 1960s and the first Earth Day was celebrated in 1970, Christians have been relative latecomers to environmental protection. Yet the last few years have been marked by increased advocacy, education, theological reflection, and action from Christians passionate about creation care.

Global warming especially has served as a catalyst for many Christian campaigns, perhaps because of the urgency of the environmental problems, the broad scientific consensus on the issue (only politicians debate whether humans are responsible for climate change anymore), and global warming's catastrophic effects that will fall overwhelmingly on the world's poor and vulnerable. From the cleverly named What Would Jesus Drive? campaign in 2002 (encouraging Christians to reduce their fuel consumption and air pollution through making more mindful transportation choices) to February's launch of the Evangelical Climate Initiative (calling for commitment to stem the tide of global warming), Christians are beginning to raise their voices as moral leaders in the environmental movement.

In celebration of Earth Day on April 22, I wanted to share some specifically Christian resources on stewardship of God's creation. Below are links to a number of Christian environmental organizations (this list is by no means exhaustive; if you know of other groups, please share in the comments), as well as some of the scriptural and theological foundations for creation care. Later in the week, I hope to post resources for individuals and churches who want to take actions to minimize their impact on the earth.

The Evangelical Environmental Network, home of the WWJDrive campaign, is a fellowship of believers who "recognize many 'environmental' problems are fundamentally spiritual problems." Their website outlines significant scriptural support for caring for the earth, and information on global warming, mercury pollution, and protecting your family from environmental risks.

This site for Christians for Environmental Stewardship has an extensive list of Biblical quotes calling for creation care and links to other Christian organizations working on environmental issues.

The Evangelical Ecologist regularly blogs on environmental issues from a conservative Christian perspective.

The Forum on Religion and Ecology's section on Christianity highlights articles, scripture, projects, links, and a bibliography with an academic slant on integrating Christian faith and environmental protection. (Disclosure: I briefly worked on this project.)

A Rocha is a Christian organization that sponsors nature conservation projects worldwide.

The National Religious Partnership for the Environment is an association of faith groups including the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the National Council of Churches of Christ, and the Evangelical Environmental Network, that "seek[s] to offer resources of religious life and moral vision to a universal effort to protect humankind's common home and well-being on Earth."

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