Discussing
Orthorexia and a theology of feasting

Bethany Keeley-Jonker

Bethany Keeley-Jonker
May 31, 2016

Might orthorexia - a preoccupation with healthy eating - be tempered by a Christian understanding of feasting?

Ljmartin
May 31, 2016

Thank you, thank you! I just returned from a healing prayer workshop and the food myths, eating rules and incidences of food shaming were pervasive through out the entire conference.

My dad grew up hungry and went to work when he was twelve so he could have something to eat. I now work with families who may only have Ramen noodles in their cupboard so we teach them how to make meals from what's on hand and stretch their food dollars. Any food that they can get for their hungry family members is a gift.

It's time to stop the shaming and the food snobbery.

Tanya Dixon
May 31, 2016

I appreciate your article. I have Multiple Food Sensitivities, and have severe reactions to specific foods and chemicals. It's important for those of us who suffer from these conditions to keep strict adherence to our diets; our lives depend on it. I, however, do agree that there are far too many diet options, legitimate ones, designed for specific conditions, that are being touted ad a panacea for anyone who wants to make a change. God designed each food created to link into a specific dietary/chemical/metabolic need our bodies have. If we choose not to use wisdom, and give due diligence to research new dietary information, assuring it lines up with our personal physiological needs, we sincerely may be doing ourselves more harm than good. I always research a product for safety and efficacy before I use it. That, for me, includes finding any groups studies done, and any physician who has information about it, then come to my own informed conclusion. I highly recommend God's people who are attempting to take good care of His temple, to do the same.

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