Discussing
The reason we’re keeping our comment threads

Josh Larsen

TimF
October 1, 2013

I can understand the decision at PopSci. They present articles to inform, not foster discussion. My blog is more like you describe here for TC, Josh. If my writing didn't prompt readers to engage in the comments, I'd start to suspect I wasn't doing it right.
Cheers,
Tim
P.S. Yes, I see the irony of commenting here after you called me out in your article.
timfall.wordpress.com

Josh Larsen
TC Staff
October 1, 2013

I figured you'd spot that, Tim! And yes, Popular Science is certainly a different beast, even if all online comment threads face some of the same challenges that led to their decision.

KoryPlockmeyer
October 1, 2013

Thanks, Josh, for the thoughtful response. I would add that TC's commitment to engaging with the authors beyond the original piece is an important part of this. The expectation that authors will respond to the comments themselves helps foster a greater sense of collaborative communication that hopefully helps reduce the amount of general internet trolling.

John Van Sloten
October 1, 2013

I don't think Popular Science would have a problem with their commenting if it weren't for OBAMACARE!

Josh Larsen
TC Staff
October 1, 2013

Thanks a lot, John. Here we go... ;)

TimF
October 1, 2013

I want to blame fluoridated water. Can I blame fluoridated water, please Josh?

JKana
October 5, 2013

You've rather eloquently summarized TC's ministry here, Josh. It means a lot to me that a community like TC exists to spark and responsibly moderate informed, probing discussion about Christian discipleship in such a wonky world as ours. In so many ways, TC has become the Sunday School class I never had growing up.

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